HEALTHY HORMONE SERIES PART III

TREATING PMS NATURALLY  

Written By: Brittani Kolasinski (BHSc Nut, Adv Dip Nut Med)

If you’ve missed the previous parts of this series, I encourage you to go back and read them from the beginning, to give you more understanding and insight for the blog posts to come.

As we’ve previously talked about, hormonal imbalances can lead to PMS. As excess oestrogen can manifest as irritability, tension, and aggression, breast tenderness, bloating, water retention and constipation before your period. A lack of progesterone can lead to feelings of anxiety, low libido, headaches, and migraines. Low progesterone can be due to the excess estrogen present as it may throw off the intricate balance of these hormones. We also know now the role that stress, and inflammation play in this PMS picture. So, with all this in mind, how do we go about treating this in a natural & non-invasive way.

To maintain hormonal balance, we need to ensure that we have the required substrates to make the hormones necessary but also have our detox pathways functioning well to ensure that we are able to metabolise and clear out any excess. Detoxification of hormones happens within both the liver and the gut. Poor digestion, food intolerances, excess alcohol, medications and consumption of coffee can all impact on these pathways and disrupt hormone levels. When hormones are not eliminated effectively it can lead to the reabsorption and contribute to conditions of hormone excess like heavy periods, fibroids and endometriosis as well as some common symptoms that can be attributed to hormonal excess.

WHAT CAN YOU DO? 

1. Support detoxification of excess hormones:

Specifically oestrogen and xeno-oestrogens that are in abundance in our chemical-filled worlds. Try swapping out coffee for green tea as coffee may inhibit oestrogen detoxification whereas green tea supports the liver to eliminate toxins sufficiently. Green tea also provides antioxidants in abundance, is anti-inflammatory and modulates the microbiome to protect the intestinal barrier from dysbiosis. Use turmeric and parsley liberally and include cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, kale, cauliflower and brussel sprouts. Drink plenty of water and increase vegetable fibre to promote bowel clearance and hormone excretion.

2. Take magnesium: 

Magnesium is typically lower in women suffering from PMS compared to matched controls. It supports oestrogen detoxification by stimulating certain enzymes and inducing the pathway in the liver known as glucuronidation, this is the key pathway to detoxify oestrogen. It’s also anti-inflammatory and quietens oestrogen receptors. Magnesium also supports the nervous system to protect against the effects of stress, ensuring cortisol is regulated and hormone production is balanced. The combination of broccoli sprouts and magnesium together, typically through supplementation, can relieve breast pain, support serotonin and GABA production to relieve emotional tension and promote bowel clearance, protect against migraines, support thyroid function, insulin signaling and balance blood sugars.

3. Consider Calcium D-glucarate:

A calcium salt that is synthesised in the body in small amounts. Supplementing with this, however, has been shown to promote oestrogen detoxification, reduce inflammation, and support gut function as it inhibits an enzyme known as beta-glucuronidase that are produced by bacteria within the gut and is involved in liver detoxification of excess hormones.

4. Reduce Inflammation:

Turmeric is a God-send when it comes to reducing inflammation and supporting hormones. It works on the liver to support healthy hormone metabolism and detoxification, as well as reducing oxidative stress and downregulates the production of inflammatory cytokines NF-KB, MCP-1, TNF-a and IL-6. Elevated levels of these means there’s inflammation present. Turmeric also provides pain relief thanks to its analgesic properties. A whole-foods dietary approach that’s rich in colourful vegetables, fruits, nuts and seeds and lower in the common inflammatory culprits that are gluten, dairy, vegetable oils and sugar.

5. Manage your stress:

Stress is unavoidable, but how we support our bodies to equip them to manage daily stressors is a vital part of establishing a healthy cycle. Stress can come from a number of sources from relationships, toxin exposure, psychological and emotional strains, trauma and even from things like exercising, dieting & food restrictions and a lack of sleep. Common stress combaters include mindfulness, meditation, and breathing techniques. Additionally talking to someone can help, either a friend or trained professional, learning to say no and take a step back, staying in for the night to wind down and relax – however that looks to you personally, or simply by turning off your phone for a day (I do this often when I feel I need to take a step back from life, a few hours in the evening or the morning with no contact from the outside world can be all I need to feel human again).

Eating enough and of the right things is essential. Think protein for neurotransmitters, like serotonin and melatonin for sleep, fats from olive oil, avocado, coconut products, butter, nuts and seeds can reduce inflammation, balance blood sugars and support brain function and slow release carbohydrates from starchy vegetables like sweet potato, or grain-like seeds quinoa, millet and buckwheat to provide B group vitamins that are depleted during times of stress. Starchy vegetables are calming for the body as they boost the anti-anxiety neurotransmitter GABA.

6. Get some sun:

Vitamin D levels are shown to be lower in those suffering from PMS compared to control groups. Low vitamin D is also more prevalent in women with endometriosis and is associated with pelvic pain. Vitamin D is obtained from food sources including free-range egg yolks, grass-fed butter, cod liver oil, and some types of mushrooms that are exposed to UV light. However we get most of our daily requirement from sunlight exposure. Although Australia may be a wonderfully sun-kissed continent, vitamin D levels are often low and deficiency is common. Optimal levels of vitamin D should ideally be around 200ng/mL, yet doctors advise that you’re ‘fine’ if you’re above 50ng/mL – I don’t think that’s enough. Vitamin D is an immune modulator, indicating its efficacy in preventing against autoimmunity. It is also known to regulate cells in the body to help protect against cancer – two health conditions that are on the rise within Australia, a vitamin D deficient population. More on vitamin D in another article “What’s the Deal with Vitamin D?”

7. Be good to your gut:  

 Your gut is one of the major elimination pathways for the body to rid itself of excess hormones, like oestrogen. Constipation is a clear indication that hormones are out of whack and it would warrant further investigations and appropriate treatments from a trained health professional. There is also a direct correlation to dysbiosis and conditions like endometriosis, with the microbiome of endometriosis sufferers having a larger number of pathogenic bacteria strains and a reduction in beneficial species like lactobacilli. The increase in pathogenic strains influence the levels of glucuronidase, meaning that oestrogens are reabsorbed by the body back into circulation. Chronic dysbiosis is commonly observed in cases of PCOS as well – more on this in future posts!

8. Nourish your being:

Getting enough macronutrients in the form of starches and carbs, healthy fats, quality proteins of both animal and plant origin, and fibre to support your bowels is, of course, important however a focus on nutrient dense foods are essential. As previously mentioned, being properly nourished supports your body through periods of stress. It’s also beneficial to include foods rich in zinc, vitamin B6, magnesium, iodine, selenium and calcium as these all support thyroid function, ovulation and progesterone synthesis. Speak with your nutritionist or naturopath about specific dietary advice or possible supplements to consider.

I always encourage you to work with your healthcare practitioner about appropriate supplementation in doses tailored to you. Stay tuned for tomorrows article “Lifestyle Factors that Affect Your Hormones”

Yours in health,

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